Parenti to Penske

Luigi Parenti (Louis)

Born 1887, Calcinaia, Italy. Laborer; union organizer. In Italy he was a Christian democrat and completed two years of seminary school in Lucca, then abandoned religious studies, married, and aided a Lucca streetcar drivers’ strike. Migrated to US 1910, with his wife. Soon became an anarchist, and joined the IWW in San Francisco in 1911. Became a lecturer and organizer for the IWW, and was arrested several times for leading strikes and demonstrations. Italian authorities considered him “one of the most dangerous propagandists in the anarchist movement across the United States,” and described him as “taciturn in character, educated, intelligent, [and] cultured.” Defendant at the mass IWW trail 1917-1918; sentenced to five years and a $30,000 fine; from September 1917 to June 1919 he was refused permission to communicate with his wife and three daughters, one of whom was born while he was in prison. Released on bail during appeal; worked as organizer for an independent Italian fisherman’s union in San Francisco, then as a correspondent for the newspaper La Voce del Popolo. May 1921 appeal lost and he reentered prison, but in 1922 his sentence was commuted on condition of deportation in August 1922. “Voluntarily departed” with his family October 26, 1922. In Italy, settled in Lucca and joined the syndicalist Unione Sindacale Italiana (USI), and attended its illegal 1926 convention. Then withdrew from radical activities; worked for a state-created union and as a reporter. 1929 Italian government reported that he “demonstrates obedience to the directives of the Regime,” but 1930 authorities discovered he was secretly receiving copies of radical publications from the US. 1932 he again reportedly displayed “good moral and political conduct” and “ideas in full agreement with the directives of the Regime.” Died 1961. (Note: An obituary in L’Adunata dei Refrattari, September 1942 for an anarchist named Luigi Parenti, who died in Paterson, New Jersey, refers to a different individual.)

INS file 54235/61; CPC busta 3732

See also: Industrial Workers of the World Collection, Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University; Kenyon Zimmer, Immigrants Against the State: Yiddish and Italian Anarchism in America

Lev Paskovich (Лев Паскович; Levi Paskevick)

Arrested during the second Palmer Raids in Philadelphia in January 1920; deported to Russia February 1, 1921. No further information found.

INS file not identified; included on list of deported radicals in INS file 54325/36G

See also: Philadelphia Enquirer, February 1, 1921

John Paskvalick (Pashvalisk)

Deported to Austria June 19, 1920. No further information found.

INS file not identified; included on list of deported radicals in INS file 54325/36G

George Pasukow

Deported to Russia October 17, 1920. No further information found.

INS file not identified; included on list of deported radicals in INS file 54325/36G

Artemy Pavluk (Артемий Павлук; Pauluk; Paulik)

Born 1885, Kamianets-Podilskyi, Russia (present-day Ukraine). Miner. Served four years in the Russian Army. Migrated to US 1913. Drafted into US Army and served for six months at Camp Lee and Camp Shelby, then discharged. Secretary of the Union of Russian Workers branch at the Dakota Mine in Fairmont, West Virginia. Arrested December 2, 1919. Deported on the Buford. Subsequent activities unknown.

INS file 54709/605

Pete Pawlas (Петр Павлас; Pawalas; Pavlus)

Born 1885 in Warsaw, Russia (present-day Poland). Czech (“Bohemian”) parents. Machinist; laborer. 1894 migrated to Bohemia; 1909 migrated to Argentina; 1915 migrated to Mexico; migrated from there to US 1917 (without inspection). Brought to US by a labor agent to work in a sugar factory near San Francisco. Described by an immigration agent as “a peculiar character, being somewhat of a ‘globe trotter’, and a student of Esperanto…He is believed to be more intelligent than he would represent.” Appears to have been a member of the Socialist Party of America. Arrested January 31, 1919 in Cleveland while distributing SP literature. In ill health at Ellis Island. Because SP membership was not a deportable offense, the Bureau of Immigration was “unable to find that the anarchistic charges in the warrant are substantiated by the evidence,” but deported him on the grounds of having entered without inspection and being “likely to become a public charge.” Deported on the Buford. Subsequent activities unknown.

INS file 54616/16

Josef Penske (Йозеф Пенске; Joseph Penski)

Deported to Russia October 16, 1920. No further information found.

INS file not identified; included on list of deported radicals in INS file 54325/36G

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